Maori and Pasifika Trades Training (MPTT)

What is MPTT?

The popular Māori and Pasifika Trades Training programme gets people into training, with an additional $9.6 million over four years.

The funding will provide places for 2,500 young Māori and Pasifika learners in MPTT programmes this year, and 3,400 next year, up from just 1,200 in 2014.

The country's Māori and Pacific youthful and growing populations will contribute significantly  to New Zealand’s future economic success.

The aim of the pre-trades training  is to help more  young Māori and Pasifika learners, aged 18-34, gain practical qualifications and use them to get into good jobs.

What is the Ministrys Role?

The funding will provide places for 2,500 young Māori and Pasifika learners in MPTT programmes this year, and 3,400 next year, up from just 1,200 in 2014.

The programme encourages young Māori and Pasifika to take up a trade and help meet some of the emerging shortages in construction and infrastructure trades.

MPTT gets tertiary providers, employers, and Māori and Pasifika communities working together in consortia to recruit and support learners in pre-trades training and to broker them into employment.

There are now consortia in most regions.

The Ministry’s involvement is at a national governance level, providing advice and support in the regions.

This is a joint initiative between Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and the Tertiary Education Commission, supported by an inter-agency group, including the Ministry of Education, Te Puni Kōkiri, the Ministry of Social Development, Ministry of Women’s Affairs, Careers New Zealand and the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

Who funds the MPTT?

The initiative currently uses $35 million of funding reprioritised from the TEC-managed Industry Training Fund over four years. The funding is administered by the TEC.

Where do I find more on MPTT?

Click here for more information or email MPTT@mbie.govt.nz.

Pacific Labour Market

Employment outcomes improved for Pacific peoples in the year to September 2015.  Compared to a year before, 10,500 (or 9.6%) more Pacific peoples were employed.

Click here for more information.